Combat Run For Knife Throwers…Are You Up For This?

If you’re a knife thrower we think you’ll appreciate this challenging knife run. Knife runs are primarily used in knife throwing competitions. Even if you never plan to enter a knife throwing competition you can always set up your own “run” for practice purposes.

In this video you’ll see a very challenging run. Be sure to check out the article below the video which explains how to set up your own run.

 

A Combat Run For Knife Throwers

By K.E. Sackett

Source: ThrowZini.com

With knife throwing increasing in popularity and even
becoming a competitive sport, maybe the time has come to
introduce a COMBAT THROWING RUN!

The space needed for a knife throwing combat run can be
quite modest. Unlike shooters, we don’t need elaborate
backstops or bullet traps.

The course can be run in either of two ways:

1) The competitor carries a single weapon, and retrieves
and re sheaths it after each throw (re sheathing is a must
for safety).

2) The competitor carries a knife for each target, and
the weapons are collected afterward.

The first option is slower, since the competitor must
extract his/her knife from each target (or hunt for it
in the grass) before starting toward the next one.

The second option makes for a faster run and allows the
judges to score more carefully, but obliges people to own
and carry as many knives as there are targets.

Here’s my list of fun, fairly challenging throws:

THROWING TO THE LEFT ON THE RUN.
Throw at a head-high target to the left of the course
while walking/trotting/running forward.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

THROWING TO THE RIGHT ON THE RUN.
Throw at a head-high target to the right of the course
while walking/trotting/running forward.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

THROWING STRAIGHT AHEAD ON THE RUN.
Throw at a knee-high target straight ahead while
walking/trotting/running forward.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

THROWING STRAIGHT AHEAD ON THE RUN II.
Throw at a target mounted approximately eight feet high
straight ahead while walking/trotting/running forward.
Twelve feet minimum distance. A stepladder will be
positioned to make it possible for the competitor to
retrieve the knife.

THROWING WHILE VAULTING AN OBSTACLE.
Throw at a chest-high target while vaulting a horizontal
obstacle approximately three and one-half feet above
the ground.

Eight feet minimum distance.
THROWING THROUGH A WINDOW.
Throw at a chest-high target while leaning through a
window-sized opening. The feet must be on one side of
the opening, the throwing shoulder on the other.
Eight feet minimum distance.

THROWING FROM UNDER AN OBSTACLE.
Throw at a chest-high target while maneuvering under a
horizontal bar approximately three and one-half feet
above the ground.
Eight feet minimum distance.

THROWING AT A TARGET WHILE TURNING.
Throw at a chest-high target after moving past it.
This requires the thrower to walk/trot/run past the
target, then turn 180 degrees and throw back in the
direction he/she has come.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

THROWING WHILE ON ONE FOOT.
Throw at a chest-high target while standing on one foot
on a wooden block approximately one foot high and one
foot square on top.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

THROWING AROUND AN OBSTACLE.
Throw at a chest-high target with the non-throwing
shoulder behind a vertical post or plank.
Twelve feet minimum distance.

Well, I could add more. Yes, I know you have your own list,
and probably think mine is pretty tame. And that’s great; the
idea here is to use our ingenuity to work up a fun, difficult
knife throwing event that everyone can go out for.

Let’s think about prizes next!

Article Contributed by:
K.E. Sackett
[email protected]

 

READ  How To Make A $259.99 Yeti Style Super Ice Chest Cooler For About $5. Totally Awesome, And Easy To Make

Leave a Reply

About

Ready - Inform - Defend