Top 20 Survival Supplies You Need To Get Through Any Disaster

You never know when a disaster or survival situation will arise. With winter coming there are all sorts of things that can be thrown your way.

Having the right survival supplies will help you get through almost any emergency. Here we are going to take a look at the 20 most critical supplies you should have on hand.

Here’s a list of 20 survival supplies that will get you through most disasters, and survival situation.

1) Large Supply of Bottled Water, and the knowledge to procure water from contaminated sources. Two of the most common methods for procuring drinking water from contaminated sources are called “distilling” (which involves boiling water and collecting the steam in a “run-off” that then drips clean water into a separate container).

The other method is called “filtering“, which involves pouring water through a manufactured or home-made “filter” system, in an effort to remove contaminates:

Before disaster hits, do some research online, and learn “how to distill water” and “how to filter contaminated water”. Then practice these methods at home with your family.

When shopping for bottled water, look specifically for “Food grade” water storage containers. These range in size from 1 gallon to 5 gallon jugs, to 55 gallon barrels and 250 gallon and 500 gallon mega-size containers
2) Non-perishable Food – This refers to any food that does not need refrigeration and is packaged, canned, or bottled in a way to provide a long shelf life. Be sure to check expiration dates .


3) Candles / Wooden Matches / Lighters – (Candles, such as Sterno’s 60 Hour Emergency Candle) are specifically made to burn for longer amounts of time than traditional decorative candles.

Like bottled water, it’s good to have a large supply of emergency candles, wooden matches, and lighters. A few weeks down the road, candles are likely to become your only light source, especially if firewood runs low and those wind-up emergency flashlights stop working.

4) Light weight Axe – Firewood is the most obvious source to provide heat during cold temperatures, and as long as you have a good axe, you can turn just about anything into firewood.

Even if you don’t have a fireplace, you can still build a makeshift fireplace or wood stove in your backyard out of rocks and mud (usable once the mud dries). You can also use a patio fire pit, as commonly sold at home improvement stores, such as Lowes and Home Depot.

(If you build an outdoor fireplace, remove the grill from the oven in the kitchen of your house, and use it for outside cooking, in conjunction with your firepit.)

Choose an axe that is both heavy duty, and light weight, because you may end up carrying it in a backpack over long distances, and the less it weighs, the better.

5) Propane for Cooking –
There is something even more useful than firewood (in the early weeks of disaster), and that is propane.

Propane is the most obvious fuel source to keep on your property, and most people who own a bar-b-cue usually have one multi gallon propane tank tucked underneath or to the side.

In preparing your home for disaster, if you have the money to spend, consider buying and filling five to ten of these. Or better yet, just as RV owners do, you can buy propane tanks that are extra large in capacity, and hold a lot more propane than typical 13 gallon bar-b-cue tanks.

Propane is a great survival tool in emergencies because it can be used for both cooking and heating (but I suggest it only be used for cooking, and that you get your heat from other sources, such as warm clothing and warm blankets; this way you use as little propane as possible, making it last longer).

Be sure to store any propane in your garage, or in a shed, or outside under a tarp – don’t store it in your home, as it can have a slow leak and poison the air.

Rather than use propane to fuel a full size bar-b-cue, I suggest you buy a much smaller compact propane stove, as commonly used for camping, as the right stove will be much more efficient, and use the least amount of propane.
6) Propane Camp Stove – As propane is the most common fuel used in outdoor bar-b-cues, a smaller two burner camp stove is best, for emergency purposes. When selecting a camp stove, choose one that can handle repeat long term use.

Warning about Lawlessness – In the event of a catastrophe, looters may be out scavenging for propane tanks, so keep yours well hidden, as much as possible.

If you’re doing any outside cooking, keep in mind that the smell of your food can drift for a far distance, catching the attention of scavengers, who (in the wake up lawlessness) may be willing to kill or seriously injure you, to take any and all water, food, and other supplies you have on your property.

 

7) First Aid Kit – Make sure you have a well stocked first aid kit, which are commonly sold at drugstores and back country stores.

With your kit, be sure to include a generous supply of Ibuprofen (pain reliever and fever reducer), and antiseptic spray for burns, stings, and cuts.

Rubbing alcohol and hydrogen peroxide are also recommended by some, for washing out wounds, in preparation for bandaging.

Anti-diarrhea medication is also recommended, as there is a chance you may eat contaminated food or drink contaminated water at some point, and suffer from it.

8) Radio and batteries – A small emergency radio is good to have around; if news is still broadcasting you can pick up reports to find out how the rest of the nation is faring during this time of devastation.

A radio is only as good as the amount of batteries you have to power it, so keep a generous supply. Nowadays, there are emergency radios for under $50 that do not need batteries, but have a wind up dial that you crank, to generate power for up to 30 minutes or more.

It might be smart to have both, this way if the wind up dial ever breaks, you still have a back up radio with batteries.

9) Flashlight / Lantern – it’s good to have 2 – 3 flashlights on hand, that are heavy duty and can withstand moisture and being dropped. Headlamps are even better, as you can wear them around your head, which frees up your hands for other use.

Today there are lanterns and flashlights that don’t need batteries; like the emergency radios mentioned above, these usually generate power by a wind up dial, and some smaller flashlights you activate by “shaking” for a short period of time.

As it’s not known how reliable these devices are with repeat use, I suggest that you have both battery operated flashlights / headlamps, in addition to the wind up flashlights and wind up lanterns.

10) Heavy Duty Tarp – Tarp is sold in most home improvement stores; choose a dark color that doesn’t stand out (in case you ever have to hide out in the forest), and have 3 – 5 tarps of various sizes. Tarp can be used for a number of things – from building shelters in the forest, to building shelters underground.

Rain Catch -Tarp can also be used as a “rain catch” for catching rain water, for drinking. Lay the tarp out flat, and then hoist it into the air from all four corners, so it sags in the middle; this is where water from any rain will collect.

Warm Room – Tarp can also be used to help insulate a “warm room”, which is a room that is set aside in your house where all family members can meet together at night, to conserve body heat. Just as children like to build “forts”, choose one room in your house that you can seal off at night, and build a “fort” inside.

Stuff a bath towel or blanket under the door crack to keep the cold from coming in and to keep body heat from escaping. Also, hang up towels and blankets over the window, and even seal off with tarp and duct tape to help keep warmth from escaping at night through the window pane.

Now that you have a “warm room” sealed off in your house, build a “children’s fort” inside (out of tarp and blankets) that is big enough for your family to then crawl inside and sleep in.

This is almost like the “igloo” such as Eskimos build in the freezing snow of Alaska. You’ll find that your body heat from you / your group will help keep this space at a warmer temperature than the rest of the house.

11) Bowie Knife – A good knife is an essential, and is going to cost some money. When choosing a knife, look for one where the blade runs to the bottom of the handle; and make sure that the store that you’re buying it from understands that you intend to do a lot of wood carving with it, so you absolutely need a knife with a handle that won’t fall apart with repeat use.

(If by chance you have to flee your home and community at some point, a good Bowie knife – also called a “Survival knife” – can be used to carve a long bow, for bow and arrow hunting like the Indians of early America.

For this reason, as well as for cutting up and carving game that you’ve killed (such as deer or elk), it is very important that the handle of your knife be exceptionally durable.)

 

12) Hiking Boots – Like your bowie knife, expect to spend some money on hiking boots. You want a pair that are going to last you, and not fall apart if by chance you end up wearing them for two years or more straight.

When selecting a boot, let the store know that you need a pair that is built to withstand heavy hiking, and that is the least likely to need any repairs on the trail.

You want a boot where the bottom sole is “stitched” to the rest of the boot, instead of simply glued to it, which is how most cheaper boots come.

13) Compass – If you have to flee your community, or if you’ve simply taken to nearby forests to hunt and fish for food, a good compass and knowing how to use it is an important tool to have. Some compasses even come with a built in thermometer and signaling mirror, which can help you out in a survival situation. To see items 14-20 go to the full article at: SurviveAnyDisaster.com

 

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