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Survival And Your Health: 3 Nutrient Deficiencies That Affect Almost All Of Us

Our survival is directly affected by our health. There is one aspect of our health that most of us suffer from, and that is nutritional deficiencies.

In the following article titled Nutrient Deficiencies That Affect  Almost
All Of Us you will learn the top 11 nutrients that we most often lack in our
diet and what you can do about it.

This is an outstanding article that you will really get a lot out of.

By Dr. Mercola

If you eat a balanced, whole-food diet like the one described in my nutrition plan, you’re probably getting adequate amounts of the vitamins and minerals your body needs to function.

If not (and this applies to the majority of the U.S. population), there’s a good chance you may be lacking important nutrients.

 

Below, I will review 11 of the most common nutrient deficiencies,1 and how to address them. Eating real food is usually your best bet, but sometimes supplementation may be advisable, especially if you’re showing signs of deficiency.

#1: Vitamin D

sunbathing

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in people of all ages, especially in those who choose to use topical sun screens (which blocks vitamin D production) or limit their outdoor activities.

Researchers estimate that 50 percent of the general population is at risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, and this percentage rises in higher-risk populations such as the elderly and those with darker skin.

Signs indicating you may have a vitamin D deficiency include being over the age of 50, having darker skin, obesity, achy bones, feeling blue, head sweating, and poor immune function.   

Your best bet is to get your vitamin D level tested twice a year. Based on the evaluation of healthy populations that get plenty of natural sun exposure, the optimal range for general health appears to be somewhere between 50 and 70 ng/ml.

As for how to optimize your vitamin D levels, I firmly believe that sensible sun exposure is the best way, although vitamin D-rich foods and D3 supplements may also be necessary if you cannot get adequate sun exposure year-round.

How to Optimize Your Vitamin D

To optimize your levels, you need to expose large portions of your skin, such as your back, chest, legs, and arms, to sensible sun exposure. And, contrary to popular belief, the best time to be in the sun for vitamin D production is actually as near to solar noon as possible.

During this time you need the shortest exposure time to produce vitamin D because UVB rays are most intense at this time. Plus, when the sun goes down toward the horizon, the UVB is filtered out much more than the dangerous UVA.

Just be cautious about the length of your exposure. You only need enough exposure to have your skin turn the lightest shade darker. Once you reach this point your body will not make any additional vitamin D due to its self-regulating mechanism. Any additional exposure will only cause harm and damage to your skin.

Avoiding processed foods is another important consideration, as they tend to be loaded with the herbicide glyphosate (used on most conventional and genetically engineered food crops), and glyphosate has been shown to interfere with enzymes responsible for activating vitamin D in your liver and kidneys. 

#2: Omega-3 Fats

sardines

Low concentrations of the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA2 are associated with an increased risk of death from all causes, and omega-3 deficiency has been revealed as the sixth biggest killer of Americans.

Most Americans eat too many inflammatory omega-6 fats (think processed vegetable oils) and too few anti-inflammatory omega-3s, which sets the stage for a number of health problems, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, depression, Alzheimer’s, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetes, just to name a few.

Telltale signs that your omega-3 to omega-6 ratio may be out of balance include dry, flaky skin, alligator skin, or “chicken skin” on backs of arms; dandruff or dry hair; soft brittle nails; fatigue; menstrual cramps, and poor attention span.

The ideal ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats is about 1:1, but the typical Western diet is between 1:20 and 1:50, so in addition to upping your omega-3 intake, you also need to reduce the amount of omega-6 in your diet, which means cutting down on processed and fried foods.

Sardines are one of the most concentrated sources of omega-3 fats,3 with one serving containing more than 50 percent of your recommended daily value. They also contain other nutrients that many are deficient in, such as vitamin B12, calcium, and choline.

If you decide to take omega-3s in supplement form, I believe krill oil is superior to fish oil. The omega-3 in krill is attached to phospholipids that increase its absorption, which means you need less of it.

Krill oil also contains almost 50 times more astaxanthin, a potent antioxidant, than fish oil, which prevents the highly perishable omega-3 fats from oxidizing before you are able to integrate them into your cellular tissue.

#3: Vitamin K2

fermented vegetables

Vitamin K2 may be just as important as vitamin D for optimal health. It’s essential for bone strength, the health of arteries and blood vessels, and plays a role in other biological processes as well, including tissue renewal and cell growth, healthy pregnancy, and cancer prevention.

In the 2014 paper,4 “Vitamin K: An old vitamin in a new perspective,” vitamin D expert Dr. Michael Holick and co-authors review the history of vitamin K and its many benefits, including its significance for bone and cardiovascular health.

Vitamin K2 is an important adjunct to vitamin D, without which vitamin D cannot work properly. K2’s biological action is also impaired by a lack of vitamin D, so you really need to consider these two nutrients together.

Vitamins D and K2 also work synergistically with magnesium and calcium, so this quartet should ideally be taken in combination.

Whereas vitamin K1 — which is the primary form of vitamin K responsible for blood clotting — can be found in green leafy vegetables, vitamin K2 is only present in fermented foods. It’s produced by certain bacteria during the fermentation process.

Examples of foods that are naturally high in vitamin K2 include natto (a fermented soy product) and fermented vegetables like sauerkraut. One of the best sources I’ve found is to ferment your own vegetables using a special starter culture designed with bacterial strains that produce vitamin K2.

Raw dairy products such as certain cheeses, raw butter, and kefir also contain high amounts. However, only grass-fed animals (not grain fed) will develop naturally high K2 levels.

Menaquinone-7 (MK-7) is the kind of vitamin K2 you want to look for in supplements, as this form is extracted from real food.

The other type of K2, known as MK-4, is only available in synthetic form, which has the additional drawback of having a very short biological half-life, necessitating taking it several times a day. Research5 has shown MK-7, specifically, helps prevent inflammation by inhibiting pro-inflammatory markers produced by white blood cells called monocytes.

T0 See The 8 Other Nutrients You May Be Deficient In Please Click Here

 

 

One Comment

  1. Frank

    November 24, 2016 at 6:05 am

    In this post you indicated vitamin D and then showed sunbathers. Sunbathers while obsorbing UVB rays the body produces vitamin D3 not vitamin D.

    I found most doctors don’t have that knowledge.

    In addition D and D3 really is not a vitamin. Approximately a century ago when doctors were numbering vitamins they believed people would not take the sun produced enzyme if it were not numbered like a vitamin. It is that important to the body because it is needed and used by every organ in the body. To other vitamin is used or needed by every organ.